Emmy Magazine’s Interview with Kurt Schemper, Korey Scott Pollard, and Gary David Stratton

SERIES INTRO: Soul-Nourishing Practices in a Soul-Deadening World

“The entertainment industry is no different than any other place with lonely people searching for gladness.”  -Emmy Award-winning producer, Kurt Schemper

by Gary David Stratton, PhD • Senior Editor

Emmy Magazine isn’t the most likely place for insight into spiritual formation.

“A writer for Emmy magazine is on the phone for you.”

At first I thought our PR director was pulling my leg. College professors don’t get calls from Emmy magazine.  Not even when you’re a professor moonlighting as the Executive Director of Act One, a community of Christian entertainment industry professionals seeking to train and equip storytellers to enter mainstream Hollywood.  Even though we had graduates writing, producing, and directing on numerous TV shows and more than a few feature films, the entertainment industry press had ever called our offices before.

Kurt Schemper changed all that.  A producer for A&E’s critically acclaimed reality program, Intervention, Kurt had just become the first Act One graduate to win a prime time Emmy Award. The writer on the phone, Libby Slate, was fascinated by Kurt’s connection to a Hollywood Christian community. But, what really impressed her was how the Act One community had lived out our faith by rallying to aid former staff member Rosario Rodriguez after her gang-related shooting while walking in the tawny L.A. neighborhood Libby called home. (Read story here.)

Libby wanted to know if Emmy could do an article highlighting Kurt and Act One’s unique mission in Hollywood.  Kurt and I readily agreed, and director Korey Scott Pollard (House, Grey’s Anatomy, Monk, Nashville, Rizzoli and Isles, Lie to Me, The Middle, Jack Ryan) signed on to represent the Act One faculty perspective.

Kurt posing with his new hardware.

As Kurt, Korey and I prepared for our interview, Korey pushed for us to be ‘really ready’ to express exactly what we wanted to say. Our conversations turned to how difficult it is to thrive spiritually in Hollywood, and interviewer Libby Slate graciously picked up on this theme.

In the course of our conversations Kurt mentioned that one of his college professors at Judson College encouraged him to pursue his calling to Hollywood by quoting Frederick Buechner:

“The place God calls you to is the place where your deep gladness and the world’s deep hunger meet.”

Kurt’s response was, “My deep gladness is Jesus. The entertainment industry is no different than any other place with lonely people searching for gladness.”

The idea of finding “deep gladness” in Hollywood really resonated with me, especially as I contemplated what a “soul-deadening” place Hollywood can be for many industry insiders. So in my interview, I told Emmy, “We’ve found that the spirituality taught by Jesus is an ideal starting place for guiding industry professionals on a soul-nourishing spiritual journey.”

That language resonated with Emmy readers as well, and soon opened doors all over Hollywood. Now it leads to this new series entitled, “Soul-nourishing Practices for a Soul-deadening world: Finding the Voice of Your Own Gladness in Hollywood and Beyond.”

My hope is that these posts will help filmmakers, educators and other culture makers find their own “deep gladness” through the soul-nurturing practices Jesus taught his first followers over 20 centuries ago. Not mere religious practices targeted at greater self-righteousness, but spiritual practices targeted at nurturing a deeper connection to God.

We officially launched the series earlier, but today I thought you might want to read the original Emmy article. (I couldn’t figure out how to post it directly, so you’ll have to download the article as a pdf.)  Enjoy!

Click to download Emmy Magazine Article PDF

 

NEXT:  Connecting to the Life of God in Hollywood, the Ivy League, and Beyond – Soul-Nourishing Practices in a Soul-Deadening World

When a Star ‘Loses It’ Emmy Roundtable Video: TV Showrunners on how they would handle a Charlie Sheen

Bill Prady (“Big Bang Theory”), Steve Levitan (“Modern Family”), Dan Harmon (“Community”) and others explain how they would handle the “Two and a Half Men” situation.

The Hollywood Reporter‘s annual Emmy Roundtables don’t begin running until late May, but here’s a little tease of the great discussions we’ve got on tap for this season’s Roundtable Series.

Obviously the story of the year in TV comedy is the unfolding situation on Two and a Half Men, a topic we posed to our Comedy Showrunner panel of Bill Prady (who works with Chuck Lorre on CBS’The Big Bang Theory), Steve Levitan (ABC’s Modern Family), Dan Harmon (NBC’s Community),Jenny Bicks (Showtime’s The Big C), Liz Brixius (Showtime’s Nurse Jackie) and Mike Schur (Parks and Recreation).

See Also:

Learning to Thrive in High Stress Environments

Why We ‘Lose It’ in High Stress Environments

Soul-Nurturing Practices for a Soul-Deadening World

Connecting with God in Hollywood



 

 

 

Learning from the Best: An Interview with TV and Screenwriter, Chris Easterly

TV and Screenwriter Chris Easterly (Unnatural History, Click Clack Jack, The Shunning)

TV and screenwriter Chris Easterly is a graduate of the Act One screen and television writing program and the prestigious Warner Brothers Writers Workshop. He has written for Cartoon Network’s first live-action mystery adventure series Unnatural History, as well the screenplay for Click Clack Jack, and a new project, The Shunning premiering tomorrow night (Saturday 4/26) on The Hallmark Channel.

Emmy® and Golden Globe Award Nominee Sherry Stringfield and Danielle Panabaker Star in the Hallmark Channel Original Movie Chris adapted from Beverly Lewis’ best-selling novel. The Shunning is the retelling of some of the heartbreaking experiences of Lewis’ maternal grandmother in the Amish Community of the Old Order Mennonite Church.

Chris was given the job of adapting Beverly Lewis' bestseller into a viable screenplay

Executive producers Brian Bird, Michael Landon Jr. and Maura Dunbar selected Chris to write the screenplay for Believe Pictures and Lightworks Pictures. Said Bird, “I chose to give a newer, younger writer an opportunity to write this film… We hired Chris …and he knocked it out of the park.” (See, Opening Doors for Others: An Interview with Brian Bird.)

In celebration of tomorrow night’s premiere of Beverly Lewis’ ‘The Shunning’ I asked Chris a few questions about the film and about the greatest influences on his life and his writing.

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An Interview with TV and screenwriter Chris Easterly

THW: Yesterday Brian Bird told us how he specifically selected you to write the screenplay so he could keep his promise to his mentor, Michael Warren, to open doors for future writers.  What was that like?

According to Executive Producer Brian Bird, Chris' screenplay "hit it out of the park."

Chris Easterly: It was a great experiencing working for both Brian and director Michael Landon, Jr.  They are pros at developing story, so I learned a lot from them.

THW: Like what?

CE: I remember they suggested one scene in particular, and in my naïveté, I thought it might not work.  But after putting it in the script and seeing how it worked in the context of the whole movie, it really packed a strong emotional punch.

THW: What did you take away from that?

CE: (Laughs) It taught me I don’t know as much as I thought, or at least that my instincts aren’t always right!

Madeline L'Engle's 'Walking on Water' shaped Chris' understanding of Faith and Art

THW: Okay, other than Brian and Michael, who are the people who have really influenced you?  Let’s start with books.

CE: Hmmm? Walking on Water: Reflections on Faith and Art, by Madeleine L’Engle, Evangelical is Not Enough, by Thomas Howard; and God’s Fool: The Life and Times of Francis of Assisi, by Julien Green.

THW: Beyond individual books, any authors who have helped you over the years?

CE: Definitely!  Frederick Buechner, and Thomas Merton, in particular.  Also, G.K. Chesterton.

THW: You’re a TV writer, any TV shows really impact you?

CE: Yes, I really like The Shield, and The Wire, but I can think of more movies that actually influenced me: Rainman, Glory, The Empire Strikes Back, and Taxi Driver.

Chris lists an eclectic range of influences from 'Rainman' (1988) to the artist formerly known as 'Prince.'

THW: That’s quite an eclectic list.

CE: There are also musicians like the late Rich Mullins, and even Prince who have helped shape me as an artist.

THW: Any more?

CE: I could go on all day, but that’s enough for now.

THW: Okay, going back to The Shunning, I understand you got to be on set for the film shoot. What was that like?

CE: It was amazing seeing it all come to life.  The local North Carolina crew was exceptionally professional and cool.

THW: Did you enjoy the whole movie “scene”?

CE: Absolutely! It was fun to just loiter on set, behind the video monitor, in the wardrobe trailer, at the craft services table.

With Danielle Panabaker (center) and Emmy Nominee Sherry Stringfield on set, it's too bad we didn't get to see Chris in a cameo with Amish garb and beard.

THW: Any regrets?

CE: I tried to get onscreen as an Amish extra, but they wrapped early that day.  Oh, well. Maybe next time…

THW: I would have loved to see you in Amish garb.

CE: Me too!

-THW

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Don’t miss The Shunning: Saturday (April 16): The Hallmark Channel at 9pm (8pm Central).

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Other Two Handed Warrior TV Writer and Screenwriter Interviews:

Sheryl J. Anderson (Charmed, Flash Gordon, Dave’ World)

Dean Batali (That 70’s Show, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Hope and Gloria)

Brian Bird (Touched by an Angel, The Shunning, Not Easily Broken)

Kevin Chesley (The Hard Times of RJ Berger)

Jessica Rieder (Leverage, Hawaii Five-O)

Monica Macer (Lost, Prison Break, Teen Wolf)

Michael Warren (Happy Days, Family Matters, Two of a Kind, Step by Step, Perfect Strangers).

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Also:

Chris Easterly on ‘Paparazzi in the Hands of an Angry God’ – Icons of Heroic Celebrity:

Randall Wallace (Braveheart, Secretariat) Speech to President Obama and World Leaders at the National Prayer Breakfast

Fresh story ideas a tough sell in Hollywood, by Nicole Sperling

Joel and Ethan Coen Spill Their Screenwriting Secrets to the Hollywood Reporter