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Ten Habits of Highly Creative People, by Scott Barry Kaufman and Carolyn Gregoire

January 30, 2016

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The discovery of the “default network” of the brain—the part of the brain at work when we are not purposefully engaged in other tasks—is one of the most important recent discoveries in neuroscience. Neuroscientists have discovered that solitary, inwardly focused reflection employs a different brain network than outwardly focused attention.

The discovery of the “default network” of the brain—the part of the brain at work when we are not purposefully engaged in other tasks—is one of the most important recent discoveries in neuroscience. Neuroscientists have discovered that solitary, inwardly focused reflection employs a different brain network than outwardly focused attention.

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The Intelligence of Emotions: Philosopher Martha Nussbaum on How Storytelling Rewires Us

December 6, 2015

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The stories we tell ourselves about who we are and what we feel shape our emotional and ethical reality, which of course is the great psychological function of literature and the reason why art can function as a form of therapy.

The stories we tell ourselves about who we are and what we feel shape our emotional and ethical reality, which of course is the great psychological function of literature and the reason why art can function as a form of therapy.

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The Science of Stress and How Our Emotions Affect Our Susceptibility to Burnout and Disease, by Maria Popova

August 2, 2015

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How your memories impact your immune system, why moving is one of the most stressful life-events, and what your parents have to do with your predisposition to PTSD.

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This is your Brain on Beethoven! Daniel J. Levitin and Understanding the Neuroscience of Music

March 13, 2015

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The relationship between music and science is more complicated (and beautiful) than we ever imagined.

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Why has the Imagination been Sidelined in Literature? by Damien G. Walter

November 23, 2014

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Einstein once famously proclaimed that “The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.” Yet we find ourselves at the position today where any non STEM subject has seen a de facto obliteration of its status and funding. That’s not a criticism of STEM subjects or their creative potential, but as Einstein was trying […]

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Why Spiritual Transformation has a lot to do with the Brain, by Rob Moll

November 8, 2014

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The attention required in spiritual practices like deep prayer, contemplation, study, and worship is what the brain needs to grow in lasting ways.

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Empathy, Neurochemistry, and the Dramatic Arc, by Paul J. Zak

November 4, 2014

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Why do our palms sweat as we watch James Bond fight for his life? Paul Zak’s research is uncovering how stories shape our brains, tie strangers together, and move us to be more empathic, generous and connected. Part 1.

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Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling, by Paul J. Zak, PhD

November 2, 2014

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We found that character-driven stories consistently cause oxytocin synthesis. Viewers will literally bond with the characters and share their emotions, and after the movie ends, they are likely to continue mimicking the feelings and behaviors of those characters.

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After the Apocalypse: Our Love/Hate Relationship with Technology, by Barry Taylor, PhD

February 19, 2013

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I have been thinking a fair bit about this fascination that there seems to be with the idea of post-apocalypse, post-technological collapse. It’s evident in things as diverse as The Hunger Games, The Walking Dead, and JJ Abrams produced, Revolution’s, exploration of a world without electricity. It seems to echo the on-going love/hate relationship we […]

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Searching for the Soul Film Festival Explores Humanity in a Technological World

October 7, 2012

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Investigating the Meaning of Humanity in a Technological World A festival bringing together filmmakers, scholars, students, and the public to view and discuss three feature films asking important questions about science and the soul. Saturday, October 13, 2012 Sutherland Auditorium Screenings at 12:30, 3:00 and 7:00 For more Information visit the Searching for Soul Film […]

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The Source of Creativity?

September 26, 2012

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Our language determines our realities, not the other way around.

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Is Free Will an Illusion? Neuroscience Takes a Calvinistic Bent

March 19, 2012

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Fascinating (and troubling) forum in Today’s Chronicle of Higher Education Free will has long been a fraught concept among philosophers and theologians. Now neuroscience is entering the fray. For centuries, the idea that we are the authors of our own actions, beliefs, and desires has remained central to our sense of self. We choose whom […]

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The Search for the Historical Adam: How One Scientist’s Faith is Changing the Conversation

December 16, 2011

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Faith and Science Week: Part 3 One of the principal controversies in the contemporary science vs. faith debate is the intended “historicity” of the Genesis creation account in general and the creation of humanity in particular. Senior correspondent for TIME magazine, Richard N. Ostling‘s does a great job of summarizing the four historical “camps” in modern attempts […]

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Science, Religion and Politics: Mixed Results, by Dr. Rusty Pritchard

December 14, 2011

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2011 Faith and Science Week: Part 2   Science and religion are at war. Or, at least that’s the impression you might get from bloggers who watch the spectacle of Republican primary candidate debates. Columnists at the New York Times and the Washington Post are up-in-arms at the hostility toward, and ignorance of, science on the part of the […]

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Can Science Explain Everything? MIT Scientists Says ‘No’

December 12, 2011

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2011 Faith and Science Week: Part 1 By David Wheeler in Percolator Washington — There’s a new bully on the intellectual block, shoving scholars around. Lots of them are caving into the threats. The bully’s name is “scientism,” the belief that science has a monopoly on all real knowledge. All other knowledge, scientism asserts, is simply opinion, […]

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